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LEARNING CURVEBALL: Student Debt On The Rise

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West Des Moines -- Jack Oberman is about to attend a school that most Americans and most of his classmates can't get into.  "They’re all trying to get as many scholarships as they can and get everything so they can pay for their college."  Unlike the graduating Waukee senior, most students aren't cut out for one of the nation's prestigious military academies, and the benefits that they offer.  "Not only will I have a free education (provided by the U.S. Naval Academy), but also a guaranteed job right after I graduate, which is awesome,” said Oberman.

So, for the rest, it’s student loans, which means student debt.  Right now, it's a major national debate.  House Speaker John Boehner said, "It's an election year, but my God do we have to fight about everything?"  There’s no fight about the desire to stop student loan interest rates from doubling on July first.  House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi credited President Obama with getting Congress to act.  She said, "The Republicans have folded because the president made the issue too hot to handle."

Speaking to a crowd at The University of Iowa this week, the president laid out his demands to Congress to pass his plan make college more affordable, “Because it's saving middle class families thousands of dollars.  They get a tax break when they are helping their kids go to college."

Republicans passed the president’s plan on Friday.  Now, the fight is over how to pay for it.  Republicans want to cut women's health screenings.  Democrats want to target wealthy corporations.  In the meantime, students and parents have the same two options they've always had; to save as much money as possible, and to study as hard as possible.  Oberman said, "I really had my sights set on an academy since I was about eleven (years old)."