HUNGER EXHIBIT: Faces, Voices Tell Haunting Personal Stories

For one it was a car accident…others were cast in as innocent children..

Maybe there was cancer or mental illness…it varies. 

But through all of the faces on exhibit, the final consequence runs as a common thread.

One of the many compelling stories is Judy’s.

“I’ve been countless nights laying with nothing in my stomach because I’ve tried to feed my kids first.”

The story of hunger is in their faces, and voices…captured by artist, Michael Nye.

“Every story has a point of view,” says Nye, a San Antonio native. “And if you’re aware of that point of view, it’s precious, it’s rare, it’s valuable. And I think that’s one of the misconceptions that stories of hunger are the same.”

Nye’s exhibit is the result of over fours’ labor in the margins of society

“There’s two different types of documentaries,” he says, “one is trying to shape public opinion, the other is just trying to gather the information as you hear it.”

This would seem to accomplish both…by putting a face on a sad reality of America, and bringing it home.

“Most of us could be just one step away from some of these happening in our lives,” says Carey Miller, Executive Director of the Food Bank of Iowa, ” one circumstance could change your life and you could be facing the issue of hunger.”

The Food Bank jumped at the chance to host Nye’s exhibit, this month.  Putting their message in his voices, like Judy’s.

“Just to hear them ask for something else to eat, and have to tell them we ain’t got it.  There ain’t nothin’ else.  It’s the most agonizing and heartfelt sickness a mother can go through.”

Thirty stories in all. Heart-wrenching but sometimes uplifting, all the while falling into the haunting depths of Nye’s photographs.  It’s an experience the Food Bank of Iowa would ask you to consider…and perhaps one you wouldn’t forget.

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