TOWN FLOODED: Kellogg Working To Stay Dry

Holmdahl City Park on the south side of Kellogg is where Dustin Mouchka takes his kids on the weekends.

“The local gas station sells ice cream so we go over there and take it to the park,” said Mouchka.

The park is also where Lynnville-Sully senior Nathan Gull was supposed to celebrate a milestone with friends and family.

“I was supposed to have my graduation party at 4 PM, and graduation was today at 2,” said Gull.

Now the park is entirely under water.

City officials are scrambling to keep the rest of the town dry.

“Our main focus is to save the water plant, the sewer plant, and the wells outside of town,” said Chief Dennis Witte from the Kellogg Fire Department.

Crews spent much of Sunday morning sandbagging areas on the south part of town.

They were too late to save dozens of homes from flooding along Railroad Avenue.

Gene Wisenen has been restoring a house just a few football fields away from the North Skunk River.

Sunday, he planned on working on the living room but now he has to pump more than six feet of water out of his basement.

“Anything I had plugged in that ran anywhere close to the floor is going to be thrown away,” Wisenen told Channel 13 News.

Crews from neighboring towns like Sully have helped Kellogg prepare for the flood waters.

Tara Conover in Lynnville says “we opened our camper door to find us all in water. No one told us and the DNR said this had never happened before.”With more rain in the forecast, Kellogg workers could soon be returning the favor.

“Prairie City, Colfax, Newton and Sully are all at risk. Anytime it rains six or seven inches in a couple hours, systems can’t handle that,” said Scott Keenan, Mayor of Kellogg.

This is likely just the beginning of the flooding and towns east of Des Moines are getting ready for the long haul.

So far there are no plans to evacuate residents in Kellogg.

City officials say it is likely parts of Highway 6 and Highway 224 will be closed by Monday.

Kellogg is also under a boil advisory Sunday night.

The DNR says the heavy rains have inundated drinking water wells possibly contaminating them with bacteria.

Any water used for drinking or cooking should first be brought to a boil for one minute.