PARVO PROBLEM: Puppy Mill Customer’s Warning

The Humane Society featured it as one of Iowa’s worst puppy mills. Now a former customer is speaking out about her experience with Julie’s Jewels.

Natasha Chinnery says she wanted a Bichon because she wanted a playful puppy. “I remember when I first picked her up she just shook all the time. Like she was scared almost,” said Chinnery.

Chinnery didn’t think anything of it, until she brought 10 week old Evie home. A few days later Chinnery learned Evie had parvo. Untreated it has a high mortality rate, especially for young dogs, which is why her veterinarian told Chinnery to contact the dog breeder Julie’s Jewels in Jewell.

“She was very hostile and very angry. She was very defensive,” said Chinnery.

Chinnery says Julie’s Jewels told her it wasn`t responsible, and that they would quarantine the remaining puppies.

“Honestly, unless they were sold I`m guessing they died. And that`s very sad. Because the vet said it will straight up kill them. And that they were exposed,” said Chinnery.

After spending days in the animal hospital and hundreds of dollars in medical bills Evie’s made a full recovery. “I don`t think I could have picked a better dog,” said Chinnery.

But she says she hopes others looking to buy a puppy do their research first. “I think it`s good that people know the truth and hopefully this will bring at least knowledge about it and if not justice to the fact of what she`s doing. Because I know that they have a lot of other dogs that are obviously being mistreated.”

After failing an earlier inspection, the Iowa Department of Agriculture re-inspected and approved Julie’s Jewels in February. Chinnery bought her dog in March, less than a month later.

The Iowa Department of Agriculture representatives say the dog could have contracted the disease after leaving the puppy mill.

9 comments

  • Tara Hansen

    “Natasha Chinnery says she wanted a Bichon because she wanted a playful puppy. “I remember when I first picked her up she just shook all the time. Like she was scared almost,” said Chinnery.

    Chinnery didn’t think anything of it, until she brought 10 week old Evie home. A few days later Chinnery learned Evie had parvo. Untreated it has a high mortality rate, especially for young dogs, which is why her veterinarian told Chinnery to contact the dog breeder Julie’s Jewels in Jewell.”
    SOME QUESTIONS THAT SHOULD HAVE BEE ASKED…
    Why did the Vet “test” for parvo, and was it a SNAP tests? (they are Known for false Positives)
    What Treatment was the dog given? ???
    What was the reasoning the pup was left at the hospital??
    I do not say the pup didn’t have parvo but the “news” is pretty biased here?? What vet clinic did she take the pup to and did she contact the breeder right away or not until there was huge vet bills. most breeders do have contract that require a visit to a vet for a heath check with in 24 to 48 hours after you take ownership of the dog.
    It just seems that more and more this “news” is wanting not to help any one but more to vilify the breeders??
    I hope the people of Iowa would do research and talk to happy customers…. We all know that Good News travels fast… BUT BAD news travels FASTER and grows as it travels… :(

  • BaaBwaWawa

    That seems like a cowardly comment from the Dept. of Ag. person, as well as attempting to shade things toward business-friendly. Stupid.

  • soapbox

    I would like to ad a comment Puppies are usually raised by breeders who keep them in the house or a building where they can not contract parvo. For those who do not know parvo usually is contracted from infected ground. Which means the puppy has been taken outside to potty. Puppies who have had only one or two vaccines are not protected from the parvo virus. Please do your research before bashing breeders. Breeders usually take a lot more precaution than ordinary pet owners because it is their business and a bad reputation will put them out of the breeding business. Parvo is a spore virus that can live up to a year in a house and seven years in a yard. Puppies should be trained to pads for at least the first four months of their lives to avoid infection. There are those breeders who are bad breeders and will always be out there. NOT all breeders are bad and puppy mill is not an appropriate term to use to cover all breeders.

  • Bonnie

    This lady is a criminal. And those of you defending her are crazy! What white trash! Her PUPPY MILL is a torture chamber for dogs! Shut her down!!

  • sarah

    How can people still be defending puppy millers? I’ve seen the survivors, matted, thin, filthy dogs with rotting teeth and a fear of contact. They often haven’t been vaccinated or seen by a vet in ages. This is a well documented problem with puppy mills. Medical neglect is often ignored by USDA investigators. The USDA requirements themselves are a joke. These are not small volume hobby breeders. Puppy mills are high volume puppy factories who give the animals little to no attention unless they are whelping. Please research puppy mills and their cruel practices before defending them.

  • Kimberley Schmidt

    stop buying from Puppy Mills-as a purchaser you continue the demand which keeps up the supply-and puppy mills are nothing more than a money maker-clearly the animals do not matter-

  • Kerry Trzebiatowski-Steinert

    Until people STOP buying puppies from “breeders” and pet stores, there will be puppy mills. Puppies need to stop being seen as a “business” and start being seen as living, feeling, breathing, beings. I can’t even say how frustrated I get when I see another dog breeder advertising their puppies online or in the newspaper. Start going to your local animal shelter to rescue a dog that will otherwise be put down, or check online for breed specific rescuers in your area. People need to stop buying and start rescuing.

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