Latino Organizations in Iowa Say They Will Never Support Trump

Latinos in Iowa only represent six percent of the population, but it's an ever-growing community.

Local Latino organizations say despite Donald Trump's so-called softening of his rhetoric on immigration, there is nothing he can do to win their votes.

“There really is nothing in the platform that Trump has proposed that would encourage any of us to support him,” said Joe Enriquez Henry, the National Vice President for LULAC of the Midwest Region.

Enriquez Henry is not holding back at all, saying Trump doesn't stand a chance.

“One out of every four voters who`s going to vote on Nov. 8 will be from the minority community,” he said. “Most of which will be from the Latino community. Trump is not going to get our vote.”

Enriquez Henry says at this point there's nothing Trump can do to win over Latinos.

“He`s built his record upon hate and mobilizing on hate,” he said. “He has been using it to the extent in his campaign to where it has had a negative impact here in Iowa, especially with school aged kids. What happened in Perry, Iowa, with the basketball team with Latinos there was a perfect example of the type of hate that he has created.”

The chair of the Iowa Latino Community Center agrees.

“Mexicans everywhere are hoping that Mr. Trump will not become President of the United States,” said Alejandro Orozco

As for Trump's trip to Mexico, Orozco says the fact that the Mexican president even invited Trump is offensive to many.

“Mexicans were very surprised by the invitation and they`re very upset, the majority because it sends the message that Trump`s attacks and insults to Mexico and Mexicans are acceptable.”

And even if Trump softens or walks back his original hard-line stance of rounding up and deporting 11 million illegal immigrants, Orozco says it won't matter.

"Mexicans will never forget the words that he`s chosen to refer to Mexicans and the relationship between Mexico and the United States,” he said. “No matter what he does for the remaining of his campaign, the damage is done and it is not going to go away.”

The lowest percentage of Latino voters won by a Republican in recent memory was in 1996, when Bob Dole got only 21 percent.