Cedar Falls Continues Cleanup Phase After Floods

CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- As Cedar Rapids waits for the river to return to normal, other cities along its banks have already moved into the cleanup phase, including Cedar Falls.

First, residents had to move their things out and now they have to move their things back in. That means friends, family and neighbors are all helping out and working together. All the while, there's still a lot of water all around.

“It was awfully high, the lower fence was covered,” said Jim Brown, City of Cedar Falls. “I didn`t see that until a little bit after the crest.”

“It`s just unbelievable, it`s just odd,” said Carol Murley. “In 2008, it went over the basketball hoops it didn`t get that high this time but yeah it`s real different.”

For folks who live in the neighborhood but evacuated, like Murley, the task of moving back in means a lot of hard work.

“Today`s been crazy and we`ve been really busy,” said Murley. “We`ve got loads of furniture back in, we`ve been just getting things really cleaned up and we had a lot of stuff up there, up above this garage and just hauling and putting things back together."

This isn`t the first time this neighborhood has seen flood waters rise.

“This year we had a lot more time as far as we knew how bad it could get up here so all of us pulled everything out of our basements,” said Alexis Richter Buss. “In 2008, we lost everything.”

Richter Buss says this year the biggest problem caused by the floods was sewage and backup.

“Through our toilets, back through our sinks, shower drain downstairs, it`s not fun,” she said.

The city also doing what it can to help clean up.

“The city had to wait a little while longer, as you can see, it`s a massive pump, it`s going to pump all this water and of course where do you put the water, and so they had to have a big enough pump not only to grab the water but to transport, using the proper area to not create anymore flooding or anymore issues,” said Brown.

The mayor says the water came within a couple feet of breaching the levy protecting both downtown and the city's water treatment facility.