Sen. Grassley Town Hall Jam Packed in Iowa Falls

IOWA FALLS, Iowa  --  Several deputies from the Hardin County Sheriff's Office were on hand Tuesday as Senator Chuck Grassley attended a heated town hall meeting at the Iowa Falls Fire Department.

Inside the meeting, Grassley faced a room packed full of people who wanted their concerns on a variety of topics to be heard by the senator.

As soon as Grassley entered, the people began shouting questions at him. As a result, the senator asked people to present their questions one at a time so he would be able to provide an answer.

Topics the senator was asked about included the Affordable Care Act, the Supreme Court Justice nominee, gun rights, and the new U.S. Secretary of Education.

Grassley was also asked about refugees, and he told the group that "we want refugees."

Another issue was the quality of Iowa's waterways and the future of the EPA, a group from which some people suggested Grassley seek more help. The Senator said the Waters of the U.S. rule would give control to the government over 97% of Iowa land.

"I think it was communicated that we don’t like what is going on in Washington DC," said Marian Kooper of Ackley. "The Senate as well as the rest of Congress has a duty to do things, for instance, like hold Trump in check."

"The traditional family farm needs to be fought for, I’m pleading with you to do it," said Chris Petersen, a farmer from Clear Lake. "Across the board, wake up Senator, the working class is starting to speak. It's the family farmers, its the teachers, its the factory workers, the list is long."

"The left has to understand just because they want to say the majority doesn’t support you, that’s false, they’re delusional, the majority does support him," said Andy Cable of Hardin County. "I was not a happy camper when President Obama won eight years ago, but I didn’t run around to Democratic functions, or anything else, and call names and scream or interrupt the speakers."

Afterward Sen. Grassley said he was not surprised by the crowd at the town hall. He said it was even more chaotic at some of his meetings back in 2009.

"I’ve learned that we’ve got issues that people feel very strongly about, and most of those issues out there will be dealt with," said Sen. Grassley. "I don’t think people had a chance to hear me as much as they normally would at a town meeting because there were long speeches, applause, and some interference, but if they want me to listen to them, I’m willing to listen to them."