Subway Says New Study Proves its Chicken is Chicken

UNITED STATES  —  Subway has released results from two independent laboratories that proves the restaurant’s chicken is chicken, disproving a study from CBC Marketplace that suggested the restaurant’s chicken contains less than 50 percent chicken DNA.

“Test results from laboratories in Canada and the U.S. clearly show that the Canadian chicken products tested had only trace amounts of soy, contradicting the accusations made during the broadcast of CBC Marketplace,” Subway representatives said in a press release.

Subway sent chicken samples to Maxxam Analytics in Canada and Elisa Technologies in Florida. Both labs conducted separate tests and determined less than 1% soy protein in all samples.

According to Subway, the 1% consists of marinade and spices.

“The stunningly flawed test by Marketplace is a tremendous disservice to our customers. The safety, quality and integrity of our food is the foundation of our business. That’s why we took extra caution to test and retest the chicken. Our customers can have confidence in our food. The allegation that our chicken is only 50% chicken is 100% wrong,” said SUBWAY President and CEO Suzanne Greco.

The CBC is not budging on the results of their study and cited the results of the survey that shows Subway’s sample had much higher plant DNA than other samples. However, the study methods have not been released — only the conclusions and percentage results.

Subway did confirm its list of ingredients in its chicken patty and chicken strips. “Soy protein concentrate” is listed as an ingredient in the chicken strips, and “soy protein” is an ingredient in the chicken patty. According to the CBC, none of the other sandwiches tested listed soy as an ingredient.