Ames Police Ready for Big Crowds Coming to Town for Cy-Hawk Game

AMES, Iowa  --  Tens of thousands of fans are flocking to Ames this weekend for the big Cy-Hawk game, and police will be out in full force to deal with the crowds. From traffic headaches to alcohol-fueled fights, police expect to deal with all the problems that come with the big crowds for the big game. But with extra bike, foot, and vehicle patrols, they're ready for the challenge.

And the partying has already begun.

"We're gonna hang out tonight and tailgate all night and we're going to stay out here and then we'll be here all day tomorrow," said tailgater Rob Van Dyke.

Tailgating all day and all night for the big game means lots of drinking.

"There's always those few that always get, you know, they don't know how to control themselves and just let it go away, and it's just ridiculous," said tailgater Jim Koenig. "I mean, we're all adults. Let's act like adults."

Just how out of control things might get depends on a lot of factors, like the weather, how much people have to drink, and who wins the game.

"With the early game, I'm hoping that they won't have enough time to get too wild and crazy, so, but if we win it could get out of control later, but hopefully we can get out of there before that," said Van Dyke.

"I hope they behave," said tailgater Leah Gilman. "It would be nice if we behaved, but I also understand that people want to have fun, but it is a rivalry game so you know never know what will happen."

The sheer amount of people taking part in the festivities is pretty amazing.

"I know a couple years ago when the game was here, there was estimates of maybe between 80,000 (people), maybe a little bit more in and around the stadium, so that includes the 58-60,000 people inside, and they said there was probably another 20 or 25 (thousand people) outside that never came in the stadium, so you know, that's more than the population of Ames is, in a pretty small geographic area," said Commander Geoff Huff of the Ames Police Department.

With numbers like that, police have their hands full.

"So between 5 p.m. Friday night and 6 a.m. Sunday morning two years ago, we charged 36 charges," said Commander Huff. "I don't know how many actual arrests, because there could be multiple charges, but 36 was the number for two years ago and we had 385 calls for service over that 37-hour period."