Mother Voices Frustration Over Metro Kids Care Program

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

DES MOINES, Iowa  --  On Thursday, July 13th, Angelica Gray says she got a call from Metro Kids Care staff, informing her that her nine-year-old son Rayshon had hit another child in the face.

"So, I go in to see what happened, and that's when Rayshon is telling his side of the story, and then I'm telling them, you know, well if you guys see him hit the other kid, then why didn't you guys see the other kid hit him, or what was going on? If you seen that, you'd have seen that," said Gray. "They were playing tag, I guess."

Gray told the staff she didn't like the way they had been (allegedly) treating her son.

"I didn't think it was fair, because every time that someone is bothering him and he goes to them, nothing is done," said Gray. "So then he decided to handle it that one time and they kick him out."

Gray says the next day, a supervisor called her and told her Rayshon had to be moved.

"She tells me, 'well, instead of him going back to Monroe (Elementary School), we're going to send him to King Elementary,' and I told her, you know, that's out of my way from work."

Frustrated, Gray took to social media, writing on Facebook, "he has been called an a--hole by the lunch lady, a teacher has talked bad about me to him, and staff have disrespected me and my family numerous of times."

(Angelica Gray)

After that, Gray was told that Rayshon and his younger brother, eight-year-old Koshin, were not allowed back in the summer program.

"I don't understand why he's being punished. Even if they say that they want to kick Rayshon out for hitting the child, then why would they kick Koshin out," said Gray. "He didn't have anything to do with it."

When reached for comment, Amanda Lewis, Communications Officer for Des Moines Public Schools, issued the following statement: "The students were dismissed from Metro Kids for a combination of factors, including the parent’s harassment of staff. Federal laws protecting student privacy prevent us from publicly discussing the other reasons the students were dismissed from the program."

Gray denies that characterization of events, saying there was no harassment, unless voicing her opinion is considered "harassment."