Organizations With Refugee Resettlement Programs Speak Out Against Court Upholding Travel Ban

DES MOINES, Iowa  --  "Sometimes when I'm at school, some people say stuff to me," said 15-year-old Adam Dalati, who is going into his sophomore year at Waukee High School. Dalati says sometimes he gets harassed at school by students who ask him if he's a terrorist.

Dalati says he was born in America but spent part of his childhood in Lebanon, and he feels like many people in the U.S. are misinformed about Islam, so he tries to educate others on the subject.

"I could be a primary source for them because it's my religion," said Dalati. "I know what I'm talking about."

Dalati says the travel ban is a bad idea.

"I feel like it's suppressing the situation, it's not really solving it," he said. "If you really want to solve the problem, you would really almost, like, give a different solution to it."

Catholic Charities in Des Moines resettles refugees in the community and works with the State Department, through the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, for the vetting process.

"The process that these people are going through, they would have never in a million years chosen this path," said Beth Gibbins, communications and events director for Catholic Charities. "They've fled countries where their lives were in danger on a daily basis, so they are doing the best they can to do the best they can for their families."

Gibbins describes the vetting process as strenuous, and says shutting the door on people who have spent decades in refugee camps while waiting to come to America is devastating.

"We're called to help them," said Gibbins. "Our country is on the front lines of this. They're doing the vetting. We're just here to greet them when they arrive to help them have success here."