Insurance Agents Logging Long Hours in Marshalltown

MARSHALLTOWN, Iowa -- People in Marshalltown are still cleaning up two weeks after an EF 3 tornado ripped through town. Insurance agents are working around the clock to help cut the checks that will pay for repairs.

“I think the first couple days after the storm I think a 12, 13, 14 hour day was not uncommon” said State Farm agent Phyllis Mazour.

Like many others in Marshalltown Mazour was burning the candle at both ends to help homeowners who were impacted.

“I probably visited 20-25 a day for at least the first three, four days” she said.

With hundreds of claims to work through she says State Farm sent adjusters in to Marshalltown from across the country.  She expects another busy period as claims come in and clients have questions.

“They're still out there working long hours and they're out there writing estimates and issuing checks to clients” said Mazour.

One of those clients is Alan Smoldt.

“It sounded like a jet engine coming over the neighbor’s home and I tore for the basement at that time when I see all the debris flying” he said.

Smoldt and his wife came back up to a torn roof, a destroyed fence, and damaged cars.

“It probably was a day after that we called in and after we got settled in what we could do here and they were real quick on it” Smoldt said.

Smoldt said it took about four days to get a check for his cars and six days to get a check for his home damage. Now it's up to him to get the damage fixed.

“There are a lot of great contractors in the state of Iowa. I would advise people to check them out if you're not aware of them…if they aren't from our area. Check them out, make sure you get some references, make sure you're getting a written estimate from them” said Mazour.

Mazour says it's the customer's choice on who to contract for their repairs. She says to be cautious if one company's estimate is far lower than others, or if they offer to pay your deductible.

Mazour says while State Farm is working with all of their clients they are prioritizing those with catastrophic damage and unlivable homes.