So You’ve Decluttered, Now What?

DES MOINES, Iowa  --  If you have decluttered your house and have some things to donate, you have options on where to take them. But not every donation center is the same.

When it comes to furniture, you can donate anything in good condition to both the Goodwill and The Salvation Army.

“It doesn’t matter the size, if you can get it here, we will accept it,” Goodwill Retail Design Lead Sarah Ekstrand said.

If you schedule it, Salvation Army will come to your house to pick up your donations.

Some things that the Goodwill will not take are  appliances like microwaves, stoves, refrigerators, and air conditioners.

They also will not take anything with a safety expiration.

“We also don’t accept anything with a safety timeline, so like children’s car seats, high chairs, playpens things like that, that have an expiration date in terms of the safety standard,” Ekstrand said.

The Salvation Army will take appliances like microwaves or stoves, and they will even take mattresses if they are in good condition.

There are some things they will not take.

“An entertainment center is just kind of something that’s faded out, hide-a-beds faded out piece of furniture, we no longer accept those. Tube style TVs, we no longer accept. Usually when we have to discard those, it costs us a lot of money,” the Salvation Army Supervisor of Dispatch Troy Comstock said.

For those items that you cannot take to a donation center you can contact your local trash provider about taking it or scheduling a pick-up to take it to a landfill. For the metro, the Des Moines Public Works says most appliances and televisions can be recycled for about $15. Otherwise it is about $5 to take an item or about $35 for them to pick it up.

The Salvation Army will also take some unique items like broken glass. They recycle the broken glass and make road construction material.

Both the Goodwill and the Salvation Army have clothing recycling programs that transform old clothing into textiles or send them to third world countries.

“Children's clothing often gets worn so much that it’s not something that someone else would want to purchase but we are able to take those things and sell them at salvage or recycle them so even if you believe it’s something that no one would want to wear or use, we can still recycle that item, ultimately keeping it out of the landfill,” Ekstrand said.

If you have more professional women’s clothing you are parting ways with there is another company in Des Moines called Dress for Success that also takes donations. They help underprivileged women in Des Moines with professional clothing before job interviews.

Notice: you are using an outdated browser. Microsoft does not recommend using IE as your default browser. Some features on this website, like video and images, might not work properly. For the best experience, please upgrade your browser.